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    [ # ] Let Taiwan Join the U.N.
    September 18th, 2007 under Senator Dole

    taiwan.gifBy BOB DOLE
    September 17, 2007; Page A16 - Wall Street Journal

    Tomorrow the United Nations will consider Taiwan’s application for membership. It has formally sought admission every year since 1993, but this year’s application is different.

    First, the country is applying under its own name (”Taiwan”) rather than its official appellation (”Republic of China”). Second, it is applying to the U.N. General Assembly, the organization’s comprehensive body of member nations — despite the rejection of its application this summer by U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and his legal office. Third, the application may be followed by a national referendum on whether Taiwan should apply for U.N. membership under its own name — a plan that has elicited a sharp rebuke by the Bush administration.

    The U.N.’s lawyers argued that, having transferred China’s seat from Taipei to Beijing in 1971, the U.N. should reject Taiwan’s latest application because Taiwan “for all intents and purposes” is “an integral part of the People’s Republic of China.” Taiwan presents a more compelling legal case: It meets all of the requirements of statehood under law.

    It is already a full and productive member of international organizations such as the World Trade Organization and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. It has never been a province or part of the local government of the People’s Republic of China. Taiwan’s recent transformation into a modern democratic state supersedes any decades-old determination that gives the PRC a United Nations seat — even as the U.N. failed to determine that Taiwan is part of the PRC or bestow upon it the right to represent Taiwan.

    Taiwan’s political case for U.N. membership is equally strong. It is the 48th most populous country in the world. Its economy is the world’s 16th largest. Its gross national product totals $366 billion, or $16,098 per capita. With $267 billion in foreign exchange reserves, it is one of the world’s three largest creditor states. Taiwan is therefore poised to be a significant contributor to the U.N.’s operations and play a constructive role in the organization.

    Unfortunately, the United States and the other major powers discourage Taiwan in its quest for de jure international recognition of its de facto sovereignty. This is because they do not want to raise the ire of the PRC, which, as a member of the U.N. Security Council, can block any significant U.N. action, and, as a global power, can interfere on a host of issues important to the U.S. and Europe.

    Thanks to exponentially increased trade with the U.S. and Europe, Beijing feels less compelled than ever to seek political accommodation with Taiwan, or to decrease its military threat against the island nation. Expanding economic relationships may be good in and of itself, but predictions that this would produce political cracks in China’s authoritarian regime have proved wrong.

    Today, Beijing is using its newfound economic might to isolate Taiwan still further in international organizations and attempt to persuade the two dozen countries that recognize Taiwan diplomatically to switch their ties to China. Meanwhile, the people of the PRC enjoy fewer political rights and civil liberties than in all but a few of the world’s countries.

    A few short years ago, the U.S. seemed determined to change this. During his 2000 election campaign and the first months of his administration, President Bush and his team vowed to fashion a new foreign policy in which U.S. national interests, particularly in Asia, were advanced less exclusively through the prism of Beijing. In other words, the U.S. wanted to be less beholden to the communist regime.

    One of the casualties of 9/11, and the subsequent war in Iraq, was that this policy agenda became less of a priority. Our cooperation with Pakistan in the effort to topple the Taliban, find Osama bin Laden and eradicate terrorism in the region meant that we focused less on developing a higher-tier relationship with India. We also concentrated less on drawing out Japan, by encouraging it to play a more active political and military role on the global stage. Equally important, we were unable to increase our promotion of democracy in the region by fostering closer ties with countries such as Taiwan and South Korea and escalating pressure on Beijing to reform.

    The current U.S. administration still has time to correct this omission. Having been an advocate for Taiwan during my time in the Senate, and today as part of a law firm that represents Taiwan’s interests in the U.S., I believe that President Bush should support Taiwan’s application for U.N. membership. This should be quickly followed by active or tacit support for Taiwan’s plans for a popular vote on this issue in March 2008. Our close Asian friend and ally needs and deserves this recognition and support, which would at the same time advance America’s regional and global interest in promoting democratization.

    Previous: On 9 May 1996, Republican Presidential candidate Robert Dole gave a speech outlining his Asia policy, at the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) in Washington D.C. Read the response from the Taiwanese community in the United States.

    Mr. Dole, a former Senate majority leader and the Republican candidate for president in 1996, is special counsel to Alston & Bird.


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